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Get Your Boat Lettering and Numbers Ready

It’s about that time to start thinking about your Boat Registration Numbers and Boat Names for this coming season. Just thought we’d re-post some tips from last season here for your information.

Remember, each State requirements are different so be sure to check with your local codes before applying your numbers and lettering.

Hull Identification Numbers (otherwise known as ‘boat registration numbers)

No person shall operate on the waters of this state (your state) a vessel, unless the vessel displays the assigned hull identification number. A hull identification number is unique to the vessel and allows its positive identification.

The hull identification number must be carved, burned, stamped, embossed or otherwise permanently affixed (we prefer adhesive vinyl) to the outboard side of the transom or, if there is no transom, to the outermost starboard side at the end of the hull that bears the rudder or other steering mechanism, above the waterline of the vessel in such a way that alteration, removal or replacement would be obvious and evident.

The characters of the hull identification number must be of not less than 12 in number and no less than one-fourth inch in height (every state differs so check with your local Fish and Wildlife website for correct dimensions). Vessels for which the manufacturer has provided no hull identification number and homemade vessels constructed or assembled by the owner shall be assigned a hull identification number by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.

Any questions regarding the hull identification number on a vessel should be directed to the nearest Fish and Wildlife Office or to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles’ Customer Service Center which can be found by doing a quick search online with your state name included.

Check out this site for some good Boat Education information.

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Boat Lettering and Registration Numbers

‘Tis the season for boat lettering and registration numbers that is (actually it’s been since March). We’re busy creating a lot of boat names and hull identification numbers for our customers … so I thought it might be a good idea to post some pertinent information regarding the details of these names and numbers here.

Remember each State is different, but for the most part the following holds true of most:

Hull Identification Numbers (otherwise known as ‘boat registration numbers)

No person shall operate on the waters of this state (your state) a vessel, unless the vessel displays the assigned hull identification number. A hull identification number is unique to the vessel and allows its positive identification.

The hull identification number must be carved, burned, stamped, embossed or otherwise permanently affixed (we prefer adhesive vinyl) to the outboard side of the transom or, if there is no transom, to the outermost starboard side at the end of the hull that bears the rudder or other steering mechanism, above the waterline of the vessel in such a way that alteration, removal or replacement would be obvious and evident.

The characters of the hull identification number must be of not less than 12 in number and no less than one-fourth inch in height (every state differs so check with your local Fish and Wildlife website for correct dimensions). Vessels for which the manufacturer has provided no hull identification number and homemade vessels constructed or assembled by the owner shall be assigned a hull identification number by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.

Any questions regarding the hull identification number on a vessel should be directed to the nearest Fish and Wildlife Office or to the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles’ Customer Service Center which can be found by doing a quick search online with your state name included.

Check out this site for some good Boat Education information.

Hope this info helps.